Marmite. Love it. Hate it ... But ban it? We uncover the world's weirdest prohibited foodstuffs

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Image: The most unusual food bans from around the world

Via: Facebook / Marmite

OK, admit it, how many of these foods are in your shopping basket?

Ketchup

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Ketchup

Via Heinz

Our beloved tomato sauce which makes a bacon sarnie complete.

Banned in: primary schools in France

Why: it's seen as a cultural threat to French cooking among children and masks the taste of whatever they're eating, apparently.

 

Marmite

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Marmite

Via: Facebook / Marmite

Whether you love it or hate it, the black spreadable stuff is a national institution.

Banned in: Denmark

Why: the yeast extract defies a 2004 law that restricts food products fortified with vitamins. They must really hate the stuff.

 

Haggis

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Haggis

Cygnoir / CC BY-SA 2.0 / adapted / Flickr: Cygnoir

A Scottish sausage made from sheep's stomach stuffed with diced sheep's liver, lungs, heart, oatmeal, onion and seasoning. 

Banned in: America

Why: there’s a law against sheep's lungs in food products in the States. We might not fight this one.

 

Foie gras

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Foie gras

Cyclonebill / CC BY-SA 2.0 / adapted / Flickr: Cyclonebill

Made from the liver of a duck or goose that has been specially fattened.

Banned in: over 14 countries

Why: force feeding birds to swell their livers to 10 times the normal size is seen as cruel. Well, we’re not going to disagree with that part …

 

Puffer fish

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Puffer fish

Greg Goebel / CC BY-SA 2.0 / adapted / Flickr: Greggoebel

A freshwater fish that puffs up like a balloon when threatened.

Banned in: EU

Why: Let’s just say that if it’s prepared wrongly it’s poisonous. Deadly poisonous. 

 

Casu marzu

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Casu marzu

Instagram/ Via Chandrafadhillah

This isn't your average cheese. It's made in Sardinia with fly larvae (yes, you read that right).

Banned in: America and the EU

Why: it doesn’t comply with hygiene standards and can have side effects including allergic reactions. It probably doesn't taste that good in a cheese and pickle sandwich anyway.

 

Surströmming

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Surstromming

Jonathan Winton / CC BY-SA 2.0 / adapted / Flickr: Mudskipper

Swedish fermented herring that is considered a delicacy by some and smells like rotting rubbish to others.

Banned on: airlines

Why: apparently it can be explosive and falls into the category of being a dangerous weapon. Who knew herrings could be so hazardous?

 

Have you heard of a weird and wonderful food ban? And what foods would you ban if you could? Tell us in the comments below ...