Food artist extraordinare Ida Skivenes shares her secrets for making art you can actually eat

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Ida Frosk food art

Photo: Ida Frosk

If the kids start to get all cabin feverish during twixtmas, get them making their own food scenes à la Ida Skivenes. Best thing is you can eat them afterwards, too.

 

Getting started – some words of wisdom from Ida

 

  • Put out all your ingredients and equipment before you start. You want a range of colours and shapes
  • Use ingredients that are fairly solid or that can be carved easily, such as bell peppers or carrots. Avoid anything too runny, or things will get messy! 
  • Keep your workspace organised by having a small bowl for rubbish
  • Use a small, sharp knife to carve out details from sugar peas or bell peppers. Stop them from getting soggy by dabbing them with a bit of paper before adding to the food art plate
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Ida Frosk

Photo: Ida Frosk

 

  • Choose a plate that doesn’t clash with the colour of the main food ingredients you’ll be using. Eg avoid a green plate for green food
  • Choose ingredients that taste good together. You're going to be eating it later!
  • Don’t fuss over small details, it’s the overall picture and the food that matters
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Ida Frosk

Photo: Ida Frosk

Fancy a sparkling cranberry? Soak fresh cranberries in a simple sugar syrup (equal amount water and sugar boiled) for at least 4 hours, then roll in sugar. Leave to dry on a baking sheet for about an hour. 

 

Tips and tricks from behind the scenes ...

Polar bears

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Ida Frosk: polar bears

Photo: Ida Frosk

 

  • Use different sized crackers for the heads and the bodies, then cut ears, arms and legs from a slice of bread

  • Black olives make wonderful noses, just snip off the end piece and attach

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Ida Frosk: polar bears

Photo: Ida Frosk

 

Birds decorating the tree

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Ida Frosk: Christmas tree

Photo: Ida Frosk

  • Sugar pea Christmas tree: put peas of a similar size next to each other and carve decorations from hard vegetables such as carrots, bell peppers and cucumber

  • Make the soft 'snow' by crumbling up a slice of bread

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Ida Frosk

Photo: Ida Frosk

 

Mice sledding

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Ida Frosk

Photo: Ida Frosk

  • Pancake sleds: use a piping bag filled with pancake batter and pipe into your hot frying pan to help you control the shape

  • Avoid a mess: cut the mice from apple or cheese and test them on the sled before adding them to the wet Greek yoghurt ski slope

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Ida Frosk

Photo: Ida Frosk

 

Gallery: 7 of the best festive food scenes (seriously cute!)

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Ida Frosk food art

Photo: Ida Frosk

Fancy giving it a go? Tweet us your pics @Homemade or let us know in the comments below ...