Or will knowing you're about to ingest a 1,479 calorie milkshake sour your enjoyment of it?

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Image: Should calories in restaurant and pub food be displayed?

Via: HuffingtonPost / giphy.com

After a mandatory scheme in the US will see restaurants putting calorie counts on every menu by the end of 2016, UK council leaders have argued that every pub, restaurant and cinema chain should be displaying the calorie content of its food and drinks.

 

The Local Government Association (LGA) is urging food establishments to post calorie count signs in places of prominence in a bid to tackle obesity. According to the LGA, over 3.5 million children are now considered overweight or obese.

 

"We are calling on cinema, restaurant and pub chains to step up to the plate and show leadership in tackling the obesity crisis, by providing clear and graphic signs at counters and on menus," said councillor Izzi Seccombe, Chair of the LGA's Community Wellbeing Board.

 

"In many cases, people are unaware of how many calories they are consuming. Food and drink outlets should be doing more to provide clear and prominent labelling which spells this out clearly.

 

"This is all about enabling people to make informed choices about what they eat and drink. Some retailers are already introducing calorie counts and this is a step in the right direction. But the industry needs to go further, faster so people know how many calories their food and drink contains."

 

In addition, the LGA is asking for £1 billion of existing VAT to be given to councils to help fund local council schemes designed to fight obesity.

 

In the US, the Food & Drug Administration announced the new cross-country menu labelling policy in November 2014, which has been required on menus in New York City since 2008.

 

Studies on whether calorie labelling has actually affected consumer behaviour so far have been slim, however in one study by Stanford University, researchers of data from Starbucks found that average calories per transaction from food fell by 14 per cent in New York - and lasted for at least 10 months - from the time calorie counts were introduced, according to the New York Times.

 

 

What are your views on calorie counts in restaurants? Let us know in a comment or tweet us @Homemade