In our (humble) opinion, these are the best dishes for a Burns Night feast

As if you needed an excuse to celebrate all things Scottish, it's Burns Night. Bagpipes, kilts, the finest whisky and ceilidh dancing are optional (but thoroughly recommended).

 

Haggis with neeps and tatties

We seriously recommend buying a good quality haggis (veggie or otherwise). Mash your swedes or turnips for the neeps (we're not getting into that argument). We can all agree that tatties are mashed potatoes, but you can mix swedes, turnips and spuds together to get clapshot – not a Victorian disease, but a traditional Scottish side dish.

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Haggis with neeps and tatties

Via: HaggisUK

 

Game pie

If the thought of haggis doesn't float your boat, how about a game pie? Scots have a long history of wild game and this beauty made with rabbit, pheasant and chicken would make Burns proud.

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Cullen skink

This oddly named dish is a nod to the north-eastern fishing town of Cullen, where it was first made. The delicious, milky, smoked haddock broth is even more amazing when you throw in some smoked salmon and chopped chives (admittedly not traditional) for a modern twist.

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Cranachan

Made with toasted oats, fresh Scottish raspberries and distinctive heather honey, this creamy, fruity concoction is Scotland's most famous dessert. Use a few drops of vanilla essence instead of whisky if it's for the wee nippers.

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Whisky sours

We know, we know. Good scotch whisky shouldn't be messed around with, but drinking it straight will have those in kilts mooning before midnight. Avoid such shenanigans with these whisky sours and serve with Ayrshire shortbread. Richer than the usual biscuit, it's made with egg yolks and cream and will help keep even the most fervent reveller on their feet.

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